Recognizing WSIS Impacts

Unless it acknowledges key characteristics of the Internet, the World Summit on the Information Society will easily undermine it

PP Resolution 71

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PP RESOLUTION 71 (Rev. Guadalajara, 2010)

Strategic plan for the Union for 2012-2015

The Plenipotentiary Conference of the International Telecommunication Union (Guadalajara, 2010),

  • considering
    • a) the provisions of the ITU Constitution and ITU Convention relating to strategic policies and plans;
    • b) Article 19 of the Convention on the participation of Sector Members in the Union’s activities,
  • noting
    • the challenges faced by the Union in achieving its purposes in the constantly changing telecommunication/information and communication technology (ICT) environment,
  • recognizing
    • that the goals/objectives and associated activities emanating from the strategic plan for the Union for 2008-2011 could still be relevant for the period 2012-2015,
  • resolves
    • 1 to adopt the strategic plan for 2012-2015, contained in the annex to this resolution;
    • 2 to complement this strategic plan with the Sector objectives and outputs and those of the General Secretariat from the plan for 2008-2011, 188/758
  • instructs the Secretary-General
    • 1 when reporting annually to the ITU Council, to present annual progress reports on the implementation of the strategic plan for 2012-2015 and on the performance of the Union towards the achievement of its objectives, including recommendations to adjust the plan in the light of changes in the telecommunication/ICT environment and/or as a result of the performance evaluation, in particular by:
      • 1.1 updating the sections of the strategic plan related to the evaluation of progress toward the Sectors’ and General Secretariat’s objectives; this update may include possible modifications to the expected results and key performance indicators in Tables 4.2, 5.2, 6.2 and 7.2, in the annex to this resolution;
      • 1.2 making all modifications necessary to ensure that the strategic plan facilitates the accomplishment of ITU’s mission, taking account of proposals by the competent Sector advisory groups, decisions by conferences and by assemblies of the Sectors and changes in the Union’s activities and its financial situation;
      • 1.3 ensuring the linkage between the strategic, financial and operational plans in ITU, and developing the corresponding human resources plan;
    • 2 to distribute these reports to all Member States, after consideration by the Council, urging them to circulate them to Sector Members, as well as to those entities and organizations referred to in No. 235 of the Convention which have participated in these activities,
  • instructs the Council
    • 1 to oversee further development and implementation of the strategic plan for 2012-2015 in the annex to this resolution, on the basis of the Secretary-General’s annual reports;
    • 2 to present an assessment of the results of the strategic plan for 2012-2015 to the next plenipotentiary conference, along with a proposed strategic plan for the period 2016-2019,
  • invites the Member States
    • to contribute national and regional insights on policy, regulatory and operational matters to the strategic planning process undertaken by the Union in the period before the next plenipotentiary conference, in order to:
      • − strengthen the effectiveness of the Union in fulfilling its purposes as set out in the instruments of the Union by cooperating in the implementation of the strategic plan;
      • − assist the Union in meeting the changing expectations of all its constituents as national structures for the provision of telecommunication/ICT services continue to evolve,
  • invites Sector Members
    • to communicate their views on the strategic plan of the Union through their relevant Sectors and the corresponding advisory groups.
  • Annex: Strategic plan for the Union for 2012-2015
    • 1 Introduction
      • 1.1 Now, more than ever, the telecommunication/information and communication technology (ICT) industry is undergoing a profound transformation with far-reaching consequences. The development of new and emerging ICTs, the spread of Internet Protocol (IP)-based next-generation networks (NGNs), convergence in devices and networks, the rise of social networks and changing needs of consumers mean that ICTs are now fully integrated into modern lives.
      • 1.2 Telecommunication operators, service providers, policy-makers, consumers, civil society and other stakeholders are all responding and adapting to the social, economic and other changes driven by accelerating technological change and convergence in the transformed communications landscape.
      • 1.3 Among these technological developments, national and international policies, and the diverse interests of different stakeholders, ITU’s vision is to strive to safeguard everyone’s fundamental right to communicate by connecting the world. At this time of sweeping transformation of the industry, the Union needs a strong and effective strategic plan to help it respond more closely to the changing needs of its members and to prove its ongoing relevance in an all-IP world.
    • 2 The changing telecommunication/ICT environment and its implications for the Union
      • 2.1 Since the last plenipotentiary conference of the Union, many key developments have occurred in the telecommunication and broader ICT environment that have significant implications for ITU as a whole. These developments include (not listed in any special order):
        • 2.1.1 the emergence of key technologies, enabling new services and applications and promoting the building of the information society;
        • 2.1.2 continued growth, albeit uneven across countries, of the Internet and other IP-based platforms and related services, and the deployment of international, regional and national IP-based backbone networks;
        • 2.1.3 the convergence of technological platforms for telecommunications, information delivery, broadcasting and computing and the deployment of common integrated network infrastructures for multiple communication services and applications;
        • 2.1.4 the continuing rapid development of wireless and mobile radiocommunications, and their convergence with both fixed telephony and broadcasting services;
        • 2.1.5 the rapid growth in demand for ICT services, owing to the development and demand for new devices and bandwidth, which calls for strengthening and promoting regional and worldwide collaboration towards a broadband economy, which should be characterized by appropriate policy and regulatory regimes;
        • 2.1.6 the growing effects of climate change, which pose severe risks to the sustainability of global resources and survival of the world’s inhabitants, especially those communities in fragile environments and ecosystems most at risk;
        • 2.1.7 the need for high-quality, demand-driven international standards, which should be developed rapidly in line with the principles of global connectivity, openness, affordability, reliability, interoperability and security;
        • 2.1.8 the role of ICTs as effective tools to promote peace and economic growth and to enhance democracy, social cohesion, good governance and the rule of law at the national, regional and international levels (as recognized by the outcome texts of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS));
        • 2.1.9 the need for confidence of stakeholders in order to allow the successful implementation of telecommunication/ICT infrastructure: end users, suppliers, investors and governments need to have confidence that the telecommunications/ICTs they use in their daily business and social interactions and for the enhancement of their livelihood will be reliable and secure;
        • 2.1.10 the need for telecommunication/ICT infrastructure in a broadband economy to be “greener” and more environmentally friendly;
        • 2.1.11 the continuing trend towards the separation of operational and regulatory functions, and the creation of independent telecommunication regulatory bodies, as well as the growing role of regional organizations, in order to ensure the consistency and predictability of regulatory frameworks, and encourage confidence in capital investment;
        • 2.1.12 the continuing market liberalization, in particular in developing countries 1, including the opening of markets to competition, through licensing of new market entrants and greater private-sector participation, including public-private partnerships;
          • 1 These include the least developed countries, small island developing states, landlocked developing countries and countries with economies in transition.
        • 2.1.13 the trend in a number of Member States to regulate telecommunications/ICTs with less reliance on sectoral regulation in competitive markets, generating different challenges for policy-makers and regulators;
        • 2.1.14 the need for effective use of telecommunications/ICTs and modern technologies during critical emergencies, as a crucial part of disaster prediction, detection, early-warning, mitigation, management and relief strategies;
        • 2.1.15 ongoing challenges relating to capacity building, in particular for developing countries, in the light of technological innovation and growing convergence.
      • 2.2 A continuing challenge facing the Union is to remain a preeminent intergovernmental organization where Member States, Sector Members and Associates work together to enable the growth and sustained development of telecommunications and information networks and applications, and to facilitate universal access so that people everywhere can participate in, and benefit from, the emerging information society. In this context, the Union must strive to make itself more responsive to its members’ changing needs and should consider the following factors:
        • 2.2.1 the need to encourage representatives of new stakeholders to take advantage of participation in the work of the Union, as appropriate, especially as it relates to the emerging information society;
        • 2.2.2 the need to raise public awareness of the Union’s mandate, role and activities, as well as to afford broader access to the Union’s activities and programme resources for the general public and other actors involved in the emerging information society;
        • 2.2.3 the need to make optimal use of the established scarce financial and human resources available for the Union’s activities and to make every effort to enhance these resources required in order for ITU to meet its responsibilities and challenges for the benefit of its membership, particularly developing countries;
        • 2.2.4 the increasing pressure on the Union to respond creatively to internal challenges by enhancing cohesion in resource planning and utilization, enlarging opportunities for constructive partnerships, and attracting increased international support by strengthening its human resources capacity and revenue base, institutional capacity and ability to manage and share information, as well as meeting the requirement for transparency and accountability;
        • 2.2.5 in light of a greater awareness of good governance among Member States and the public in general, ITU, like many other international agencies, is facing important challenges to become a results-based and accountable organization, and must continue working toward establishing appropriate mechanisms for monitoring and evaluation functions.
      • 2.3 The need to build confidence and security in the use of ICTs for the development and growth of the information society will require building upon existing cybersecurity work and partnerships related to building confidence and security in the use of telecommunications/ICTs, requiring international collaboration to fulfil this task.
    • 3 Strategic orientations and goals
      • 3.1 The main mission of ITU – as a pre-eminent intergovernmental organization where Member States, Sector Members and Associates work together – is to enable and foster the growth and sustained development of telecommunication networks and services, and to facilitate universal access so that people everywhere can participate in, and benefit from, the emerging information society. ITU can achieve this overall mission by fulfilling the following goals:
      • 3.1.1 Strategic goal of the Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) The strategic goal of the ITU Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) is threefold, and includes:
        • • To ensure interference-free operations of radiocommunication systems by implementing the Radio Regulations and regional agreements, as well as updating these instruments in an efficient and timely manner through the processes of world and regional radiocommunication conferences
        • • To establish Recommendations intended to assure the necessary performance and quality in operating radiocommunication systems
        • • To seek ways and means to ensure the rational, equitable, efficient and economical use of the radio-frequency spectrum and satellite-orbit resources and to promote flexibility for future expansion and new technological developments.
      • 3.1.2 Strategic goal of the Telecommunication Standardization Sector (ITU-T) The strategic goal of the ITU Telecommunication Standardization Sector (ITU-T) is threefold, and includes:
        • • To develop interoperable, non-discriminatory international standards (ITUT Recommendations)
        • • To assist in bridging the standardization gap between developed and developing countries
        • • To extend and facilitate international cooperation among international and regional standardization bodies.
      • 3.1.3 Strategic goal of the Telecommunication Development Sector (ITU-D) The strategic goal of the ITU Telecommunication Development Sector (ITU-D) is threefold, and includes:
        • • To promote the availability of infrastructure and foster an enabling environment for telecommunication/ICT infrastructure development and its use in a safe and secure manner
        • • To provide assistance to developing countries in bridging the digital divide by achieving broader telecommunication/ICT-enabled socio-economic development
        • • To expand the benefits of the information society to the membership in cooperation with public and private stakeholders, and to promote the integration of the use of telecommunications/ICTs into the broader economy and society as drivers of development, innovation, well-being, growth and productivity globally.
      • 3.1.4 Strategic goal of the General Secretariat (GS) The strategic goal of the ITU General Secretariat (GS) is to achieve effectiveness and efficiency in the planning, management, coordination and delivery of services to support the Union 1 and its membership, ensuring the implementation of the financial and strategic plans of the Union and coordinating intersectoral activities as identified in ITU basic texts.
        • 1 as defined in Article7 of the ITU Constitution
    • PART I – Sectoral objectives and outputs
      • 4 Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R)
        • 4.1 Situational analysis
          • 4.1.1 In order to establish a sound foundation upon which to base ITU Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) strategies for the forthcoming years, an analysis of ITU-R and its environment, both now and in the future, is of primary importance. Such an analysis requires a clear vision of those influential factors, both internal and external to ITU, that will allow ITU-R to take advantage of opportunities that arise to meet its objectives.
          • 4.1.2 The biggest challenge for ITU-R is to remain abreast of the rapid and complex changes occurring in the world of international radiocommunications, coupled with a timely response to the needs of the radiocommunication and broadcasting industry in particular and to the membership as a whole. In an environment undergoing constant change and with ever greater demands from its members for products and services, the Sector should ensure that it remains as adaptable and responsive as possible to meet these challenges.
          • 4.1.3 Pursuant to Article 1 of the ITU Constitution, ITU-R is committed to building an enabling environment through management of the international radio-frequency spectrum and satellite-orbit resources. Since the global management of frequencies and orbit resources requires a high level of international cooperation, one of our principal tasks in ITU-R is to facilitate the complex intergovernmental negotiations needed to develop legally binding agreements between sovereign states. These agreements are embodied in the Radio Regulations and in world and regional plans adopted for different space and terrestrial services.
          • 4.1.4 The field of radiocommunications addresses terrestrial and space services that are critical and increasingly important for the development of the global economy in the twenty-first century. The world is witnessing a phenomenal increase in the use of wireless systems in a myriad of applications. International radiocommunication standards (such as those contained in ITU-R Recommendations) underpin the entire global communications framework – and will continue to serve as the platform for a whole range of new wireless applications.
          • 4.1.5 The domain of radiocommunications also includes aeronautical telemetry and telecommand systems, satellite services, mobile communications, maritime distress and safety signals, digital broadcasting, satellites for meteorology, and the prediction and detection of natural disasters.
          • 4.1.6 In line with Radio Regulations, the recording of space and terrestrial notices and their associated publications are central to ITU-R’s mission.
          • 4.1.7 The need for continuing development of radiocommunication systems used in disaster mitigation and relief operations has increased and will be a key challenge for the future. Telecommunications are critical at all phases of disaster management. Aspects of emergency radiocommunication services associated with disasters include, inter alia, disaster prediction, detection, alerting and relief.
          • 4.1.8 In the area of climate change, the work of ITU-R focuses on the use of ICT (different radio and telecommunication technologies and equipment) for weather and climate-change monitoring and for prediction, detection and mitigation of hurricanes, typhoons, thunderstorms, earthquakes, tsunamis, man-made disasters, etc.
          • 4.1.9 Our stakeholders, such as government agencies, public and private telecommunication operators, manufacturers, scientific or industrial bodies, international organizations, consultancies, universities, technical institutions, etc., through the processes linked with world radiocommunication conferences and study groups, will need to continue to make decisions on the most profitable and efficient ways to exploit the limited resource of the radio-frequency spectrum and satellite orbits, which will be critical and of increasing economic value for the development of the global economy in the twenty-first century.
        • 4.2 Vision
          • The ITU Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) will remain the unique and universal convergence and regulatory centre for worldwide radiocommunication matters.
        • 4.3 Mission
          • The mission of the ITU Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) is, inter alia, to ensure rational, equitable, efficient and economical use of the radio-frequency spectrum by all radiocommunication services, including those using satellite orbits, and to carry out studies and adopt Recommendations on radiocommunication matters.
        • 4.4 Strategic goal
          • The strategic goal of the ITU Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) is threefold, and includes:
          • • To ensure interference-free operations of radiocommunication systems by implementing the Radio Regulations and regional agreements, as well as updating these instruments in an efficient and timely manner through the processes of world and regional radiocommunication conferences
          • • To establish Recommendations intended to assure the necessary performance and quality in operating radiocommunication systems
          • • To seek ways and means to ensure the rational, equitable, efficient and economical use of the radio-frequency spectrum and satellite-orbit resources and to promote flexibility for future expansion and new technological developments.
        • 4.5 Objectives
          • The objectives of the ITU Radiocommunication Sector (ITU-R) are:
          • 4.5.1 Objective 1 – Coordinating:
            • To promote, foster and ensure cooperation and coordination among all Member States in decision-making on radiocommunication issues, with the participation of Sector Members and Associates, as appropriate.
          • 4.5.2 Objective 2 – Processing:
            • To meet the requirements of the membership for spectrum, orbit access and operations in application of the Constitution, Convention and Radio Regulations, in the light, inter alia, of the accelerating convergence of radiocommunication services.
          • 4.5.3 Objective 3 – Producing:
            • To produce Recommendations on radiocommunication services in order to achieve connectivity and interoperability in applying modern telecommunications/ICTs, as well as to provide for the most efficient use of spectrum and orbit resources.
          • 4.5.4 Objective 4 – Informing:
            • To respond to the needs of the membership by disseminating information and know-how on radiocommunication issues, by publishing and distributing relevant materials (e.g. service publications, reports and handbooks), in coordination and collaboration, as appropriate, with the other Bureaux and the General Secretariat.
          • 4.5.5 Objective 5 – Assisting:
            • To provide support and assistance to the membership, mainly to developing countries, in relation to radiocommunication matters, information and communication network infrastructure and applications, and in particular with respect to a) bridging the digital divide; b) gaining equitable access to the radio-frequency spectrum and to satellite orbits; and c) providing training and producing relevant training materials for capacity building.
        • Charts
          • Table 4.1 – ITU-R Outputs and Objectives
          • Table 4.2 – Objectives, outputs, expected results and key performance indicators of ITU-R
      • 5 Telecommunication Standardization Sector (ITU-T)
        • 5.1 Situational analysis
          • 5.1.1 The ITU Telecommunication Standardization Sector (ITU-T) operates in a competitive, complex and rapidly evolving environment and ecosystem.
          • 5.1.2 There is a need for high-quality, demand-driven international standards, which should be developed rapidly in line with the principles of global connectivity, openness, affordability, reliability, interoperability and security. Key technologies enabling new services and applications and promoting the building of the information society are emerging and should be taken into account in the work of ITU-T.
          • 5.1.3 While retaining current ITU-T members, new members from industry and academia need to be attracted and encouraged, and the participation of developing countries in the standardization process (“Bridging the standardization gap”) needs to be boosted.
          • 5.1.4 Cooperation and collaboration with other standardization bodies and relevant consortia and fora are key to avoiding duplication of work and achieving efficient use of resources, as well as incorporating expertise from outside ITU.
          • 5.1.5 The review of the International Telecommunication Regulations will set a renewed worldwide framework for ITU-T activities.
        • 5.2 Vision
          • The ITU Telecommunication Standardization Sector (ITU-T) provides a unique worldwide venue for standardization of telecommunications and ICTs.
        • 5.3 Mission
          • The mission of the ITU Telecommunication Standardization Sector (ITU-T) is to provide a unique worldwide venue for industry and government to work together to foster the development and use of interoperable, non-discriminatory and demand-driven international standards that are based on openness and take into account the needs of users, in order to create an environment where users can access affordable services worldwide regardless of underlying technology, particularly in developing countries, while at the same time establishing links between the activities of ITU-T and the relevant outcomes of the World Summit on the Information Society.
        • 5.4 Strategic goal
          • The strategic goal of the ITU Telecommunication Standardization Sector (ITU-T) is threefold, and includes:
          • • To develop interoperable, non-discriminatory international standards (ITU-T Recommendations)
          • • To assist in bridging the standardization gap between developed and developing countries
          • • To extend and facilitate international cooperation among international and regional standardization bodies.
        • 5.5 Objectives
          • The objectives of the ITU Telecommunication Standardization Sector (ITU-T) are:
          • 5.5.1 Objective 1 – Coordinating/International cooperation:
            • • To promote and foster cooperation among Member States, Sector Members and Associates in decision-making on telecommunication/ICT standardization matters
            • • To cooperate and collaborate with other ITU Sectors, standardization bodies and relevant entities (e.g. Global Standards Collaboration, World Standards Cooperation), in order to avoid duplication and inconsistencies to the extent possible, identify relevant areas for future standardization projects to be initiated within ITU-T while remaining aware of the ongoing work in other standards bodies and ensure that the work of ITU-T creates added value by promoting international collaboration, coordination and cooperation with a view to harmonizing activities.
          • 5.5.2 Objective 2 – Producing global standards:
            • • To develop efficiently, effectively and in a timely manner the required global telecommunication/ICT standards (ITU-T Recommendations), consistent with ITU’s mandate and the needs and interests of the membership, such as narrowing the digital divide, improving health and safety and protecting the environment, and developing standards to facilitate access to telecommunications/ICTs by persons with disabilities
            • • To standardize services and applications meeting global user needs that rely not only on state-of-the-art technologies but also on matured proven technologies
            • • To identify ways and means to achieve interoperability of services and equipments.
          • 5.5.3 Objective 3 – Bridging the standardization gap:
            • To provide support and assistance to developing countries in bridging the standardization gap in relation to standardization matters, information and communication network infrastructure and applications, and relevant training materials for capacity building, taking into account the characteristics of the telecommunication environment of the developing countries.
          • 5.5.4 Objective 4 – Informing/Disseminating information:
            • To respond to the needs of the membership and others by disseminating information and know-how through the publication and distribution of ITU-T Recommendations and relevant materials (e.g. manuals), by collaborating with the ITU Telecommunication Development Sector on bridging the standardization gap between developing and developed countries, and by promoting the value of ITU-T in order to encourage increased membership
        • Charts
          • Table 5.1 – ITU-T outputs and objectives
          • Table 5.2 – Objectives, outputs, expected results and key performance indicators of ITU-T
      • 6 Telecommunication Development Sector (ITU-D)
        • 6.1 Situational analysis
          • Telecommunications/information and communication technologies (ICTs) play an increasingly critical role in our economies and society. They have proven to be a powerful driver of innovation, growth and productivity globally. Broad access to telecommunications/ICTs provides significant opportunities for improving government public services, healthcare, education and the environment. Telecommunications/ICTs also open new channels for sharing of global knowledge resources and the free flow of ideas and opinions. However, to harness the potential of telecommunications/ICTs, governments and other stakeholders have to provide an enabling policy environment and supporting infrastructure that are robust and responsive to a shifting set of challenges and opportunities. Over the period of the next ITU Telecommunication Development Sector (ITU-D) strategic plan, these challenges and opportunities will include, inter alia:
          • 6.1.1 The digital divide
            • Building the capacity of developing economies and societies to fully leverage the benefits of telecommunications/ICTs will remain high on the international policy agenda. Promoting an enabling environment, infrastructure build-out and deployment of public and commercial applications and services that promote economic growth and social well-being constitute both key challenges and opportunities. Building telecommunication/ICT literacy and specialized skills that enable people to take full advantage of the opportunities that telecommunications/ICTs offer also remains a priority.
            • Over the last five years, the level of access to telecommunications/ICTs has improved significantly across the world. Mobile cellular has proven to be the most rapidly adopted technology in history, and the total number of broadband subscriptions has grown more than threefold. Yet, there still remains a substantial broadband divide (see below), both within and among countries.
            • Particular efforts will need to be made to support availability of infrastructure and services in underserved and rural areas, in particular in developing countries 2 , as well as among people with special needs (marginal and vulnerable populations, including women, children, indigenous peoples, older persons and persons with disabilities).
              • 2 These include the least developed countries, small island developing states, landlocked developing countries and countries with economies in transition.
            • In 2015, the United Nations General Assembly will assess the outcomes and implementation of both the Millennium Development Goals and the Tunis Agenda for the Information Society of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS).
          • 6.1.2 Access to broadband
            • National broadband infrastructures are becoming the foundation of networked economies and information societies. Following the lead of some countries which have made it part of their universal service obligations, broadband access will be increasingly considered as a basic service that should be made universally available to all citizens. To support this, governments are encouraged to promote both supply- and demand-side policies that create incentives for broadband backbone and access network deployment. Market structures that promote broadband and related services at competitive prices will need to be encouraged.
            • Governments are also encouraged to promote demand-side policies that advance broadband connectivity of schools, libraries and other public institutions.
            • Promoting broadband access will need to take into consideration the particular starting conditions in developing countries, where fixed-line penetration has been historically low and mobile penetration high. There will be an ongoing need to provide assistance and share best practices on the deployment of appropriate infrastructure technologies (e.g. next-generation networks, whether wireline, wireless and/or mobile-based) and policies that promote investment in infrastructure and service-based competition.
            • The increasing socio-economic importance of broadband access will also present new regulatory challenges, such as ensuring universal access by balancing and rationalizing access and prices in profitable and non-profitable areas, implementing the broadband backbone infrastructure, defining management models for the broadband infrastructure with a view to avoiding duplication of efforts and investments, establishing new pricing models and methodologies, mitigating natural monopolies and fostering competition, and equalizing the dissemination and adoption of new technologies and services in developed and developing countries alike.
          • 6.1.3 Convergence and the enabling environment
            • Changes brought about by the advent of high-speed telecommunication/ICT networks, convergence and global and instant access to knowledge are revolutionizing the twenty-first century. New applications and services are creating new consumer behaviour, business practices and expectations on the part of all stakeholders which, where appropriate, call for innovative and targeted regulation in a digital economy to foster growth at all levels. This technological progress and market transformation has placed an increasing strain on existing policy and regulatory regimes. With convergence, policy-makers and regulators will continue to juggle competing interests, ensure a level playing field, promote transparency and create a stable environment that nurtures the technological and service innovation which lies at the very heart of the telecommunication/ICT sector. Regulators are also facing the challenging task of ensuring affordable access to telecommunications/ICTs while at this same time creating and maintaining investment incentives for all market participants. Striking the right balance requires regulators to be kept informed of current costing issues, as well as financial mechanisms and economic modelling to be able to measure the impact and implications for the national competitive environment.
            • Meeting the challenges of the digital economy will require cross-sectoral approaches to telecommunication/ICT policy and regulation that go beyond today’s sector-specific regulation. A broader approach will need to be taken, encompassing applications and services, electronic content and consumer rights and responsibilities. As these issues are cross-sectoral in nature, clearly defining the responsibility of relevant government agencies will be a critical success factor. A careful balance will be needed between a hands-on and hands-off approach to regulation based on assessment of the broader impact on the whole of the society.
          • 6.1.4 Telecommunication/ICT indicators and the ICT development index
            • The collection, provision and dissemination of quality indicators and statistics that measure and provide comparative analysis of the use and adoption of telecommunications/ICTs will continue to be a key need to support developing economies. These indicators, as well as the ICT development index, provide governments, regulatory authorities and stakeholders with a mechanism to better understand key drivers of telecommunication/ICT adoption and assist in ongoing national policy formulation.
          • 6.1.5 Transition to digital broadcasting and spectrum management
            • Countries will continue to implement the transition from analogue to digital broadcasting with different time-scales according to their national priorities as well as, where applicable, the deadlines set by the ITU Regional Radiocommunication Conference (RRC-06) and its Plan and Agreement.
            • During the period of this strategic plan, there will be a continuing need, as a high priority, to assist administrators, regulators, broadcasters and other stakeholders in developing countries in researching and supporting the introduction of digital broadcasting. Continued assistance to developing countries on spectrum management will also be a necessity.
          • 6.1.6 Telecommunication/ICT services and applications for economic and social development, poverty reduction and wealth creation
            • Telecommunications/ICTs have been widely recognized as a driver of economic and social development, poverty reduction and wealth creation. Telecommunications/ICTs provide an opportunity for developing countries to facilitate trade and economic development in general, as well as business development and job creation, especially for poor and marginalized populations, including women, indigenous peoples and persons with disabilities. ICT applications are also an important demand-side driver that can encourage the adoption of broadband services. A continuing challenge and opportunity is to provide assistance to developing countries in order to facilitate access to ICT-based government services, improved healthcare, access to quality education and environmental management (including the effects of climate change).
            • Providing assistance for the deployment of specific ICT applications that help in integrating new technologies into the broader economy and society value chain will remain a key priority.
          • 6.1.7 Mobile innovation
            • The coming years are expected to see more rapid advances in the use of mobile technologies as a platform for innovation and new services. These include mobile healthcare solutions (e.g. mobile ultrasound and remote diagnosis); mobile payments including normal banking transactions and payment of government social benefits and taxes; environmental and biomedical sensor technologies integrated into devices; mobile learning; augmented reality and advanced location-based services; automatic interpretation; mobile social networking; and new interfaces.
          • 6.1.8 Building confidence in the use of telecommunications/ICTs
            • With the increasing volume of e-commerce and online financial transactions, the availability of government services, the popularity of collaborative and social networks and the emergence of the “Internet of things”, building confidence and maintaining trust in the use of telecommunications/ICTs will continue to be a major policy concern of governments and other stakeholders. As telecommunications/ICTs continue to be further integrated into the economy and our societies, their continuous availability, reliability and security will be increasingly vital to governments, businesses and individuals. Promoting cybersecurity and international cooperation and coordination in this domain remains a key priority in the coming period.
          • 6.1.9 Capacity building
            • Policy-makers need to make sure that the digital divide, which remains a key concern for developing countries, does not also become a knowledge divide between those who have access to the information and learning tools of the twenty-first century and those who do not. Building broad telecommunication/ ICT literacy enables citizens to access and contribute information, ideas and knowledge in order to create an inclusive information society. Providing assistance in human and institutional capacity building that improves telecommunication/ICT skills to support the development and use of telecommunication/ICT networks and applications will continue to be a priority.
          • 6.1.10 Emergency telecommunications
            • Emergency telecommunications play a critical role in both warning of disasters and their immediate aftermath, by ensuring timely flow of information needed by government agencies, humanitarian-oriented organizations and industry involved in rescue and recovery operations and providing medical assistance to the injured. There will be continuing need to support developing countries with early-warning systems, emergency communications and assistance in reconstructing infrastructure destroyed by disasters.
          • 6.1.11 The global financial crisis
            • While there are indications that economic conditions will improve by the commencement of this strategic plan, the international sponsors and institutions concerned are united in their agreement that the recovery may be weak, slow and/or uneven. Aftershocks witnessed in the telecommunication/ICT sector in developing countries include impacts on capital markets and capital expenditures, consumer lack of buying power, lack of liquidity in the banking sector and a drop in donor funding. As a result, there will need to be flexible and innovative ways of financing development projects, including public-private partnerships and enhanced mobilization of extrabudgetary resources.
          • 6.1.12 Climate change
            • Climate change challenges our ability to achieve economic and social objectives to support sustainable development. The adverse effects of climate change are likely to fall disproportionately on developing countries given their limited resources. Telecommunications/ICTs make a valuable contribution to monitoring, mitigating and adapting to climate change.
            • There will continue to be a need to help countries, in particular developing ones, respond to climate change.
        • 6.2 Vision
          • To be the leading organization for promoting the availability and application of telecommunications/information and communication technologies (ICTs) for socio-economic development.
        • 6.3 Mission
          • The mission of the ITU Telecommunication Development Sector (ITU-D) shall be to foster international cooperation and solidarity in the delivery of technical assistance and in the creation, development and improvement of telecommunication/information and communication technology (ICT) equipment and networks in developing countries. ITU-D is required to discharge the Union’s dual responsibility as a United Nations specialized agency and executing agency for implementing projects under the United Nations development system or other funding arrangements, so as to facilitate and enhance telecommunication/ ICT development by offering, organizing and coordinating technical cooperation and assistance activities.
        • 6.4 Strategic goal
          • The strategic goal of the ITU Telecommunication Development Sector (ITU-D) is threefold, and includes:
          • • To promote the availability of infrastructure and foster an enabling environment for telecommunication/ICT infrastructure development and its use in a safe and secure manner
          • • To provide assistance to developing countries in bridging the digital divide by achieving broader telecommunication/ICT-enabled socio-economic development
          • • To expand the benefits of the information society to the membership in cooperation with public and private stakeholders, and to promote the integration of the use of telecommunications/ICTs into the broader economy and society as drivers of development, innovation, well-being, growth and productivity globally.
        • 6.5 Objectives
          • The objectives of the ITU Telecommunication Development Sector (ITU-D) are:
          • 6.5.1 Objective 1
            • To foster international cooperation, among ITU-D members and other stakeholders, on telecommunication/ICT development issues, by providing the pre-eminent forum for discussion, information-sharing and consensus-building on telecommunication/ICT technical and policy issues.
          • 6.5.2 Objective 2
            • To assist the membership in maximizing the utilization of appropriate new technologies, including broadband, to develop their telecommunication/ ICT infrastructures and services, and to design and deploy resilient telecommunication/ICT network infrastructures.
          • 6.5.3 Objective 3
            • To foster the development of strategies to enhance the deployment, and the safe, secure, and affordable use of ICT applications and services towards mainstreaming telecommunications/ICTs in the broader economy and society.
          • 6.5.4 Objective 4
            • To assist the membership to create and maintain an enabling policy and regulatory environment, including the establishment and implementation of sustainable national policies, strategies and plans, through sharing best practices and collecting and disseminating statistical information on telecommunication/ICT developments.
          • 6.5.5 Objective 5
            • To build human and institutional capacity in order to improve skills in the development and use of telecommunication/ICT networks and applications, and to foster digital inclusion for people with special needs, such as persons with disabilities, through awareness raising, training activities, sharing information and know-how and the production and distribution of relevant publications.
          • 6.5.6 Objective 6
            • To provide concentrated and special assistance to least developed countries (LDCs) and countries in special need, and to assist ITU Member States in responding to climate change and integrating telecommunications/ICTs in disaster management.
        • Charts
          • Table 6.1– ITU-D outputs and objectives
          • Table 6.2 – Objectives, outputs, expected results and key performance indicators of ITU-D
      • 7 General Secretariat (GS)
        • 7.1 Mission
          • The mission of the ITU General Secretariat, in accordance with Article 11 of the ITU Constitution and Article 5 of the ITU Convention, is to provide accurate, timely and efficient services to the membership of the Union and to serve and coordinate the activities of the Sectors of the Union in undertaking intersectoral activities, as well as to support the activities of the Sectors.
        • 7.2 Strategic goal
          • The strategic goal of the ITU General Secretariat (GS) is to achieve effectiveness and efficiency in the planning, management, coordination and delivery of services to support the membership of the Union 3 , ensuring the implementation of the financial and strategic plans of the Union and coordinating intersectoral activities as identified in ITU basic texts.
            • 3 as defined in Article 7 of the ITU Constitution.
        • 7.3 Objectives
          • The objectives of the General Secretariat are:
          • 7.3.1 Objective 1:
            • Overall management and coordination of the activities of the Union, ensuring that the goals and objectives of the strategic plan are met.
          • 7.3.2 Objective 2:
            • Efficient planning, coordination and execution of the corporate, strategic, external relations, communication and intersectoral activities of the Union.
          • 7.3.3 Objective 3:
            • Providing support to, and delivering, efficient and accessible conferences, meetings, documentation and publications, including multilingual ones.
          • 7.3.4 Objective 4:
            • Effective and efficient use of human, financial and capital resources of the Union.
          • 7.3.5 Objective 5:
            • Providing ICT services to support the mission and activities of the Union.
          • 7.3.6 Objective 6:
            • Providing a platform where stakeholders from across the ICT industry and operators can connect, debate, share strategies, explore the latest technologies, do business and ultimately address the global challenges
        • Charts
          • Table 7.1 – GS outputs and objectives
          • Table 7.2 – Objectives, outputs, expected results and key performance indicators of the GS
    • PART II – Linking sectoral and GS objectives with the strategic orientations and goals of the Union
      • Table 8.1 – Objectives and strategic goals of the Union
    • PART III – General description of terms used in Resolution 71
      • Term Description
      • Mission Mission refers to the main task/key function of the ITU General Secretariat or any ITU Sector as set out in the ITU Constitution and Convention.
      • Goals Goals refer to the Union’s high-level targets to which the objectives of the Sectors and the ITU General Secretariat contribute, directly or indirectly.
      • Objectives Objectives refer to the specific purposes and aims of individual Sectors and of the General Secretariat.
      • Outputs Outputs refer to the final products and services delivered by the ITU (e.g. deliverables of a programme).
      • Expected results Expected results should reflect the desired outcome of activities (outputs, which are sometimes referred to as “outcomes”). They should be linked, where applicable, to the underlying objectives of the strategic plan.
      • Key performance indicators (KPIs) KPIs are the criteria used to measure the achievement of outputs (or outcomes). These indicators may be qualitative or quantitative. With respect to KPIs, an example of a “qualitative” indicator could be a survey of the satisfaction of participants with the organization of WTDC, which is linked to Objective 1 and Output/Outcome 1 of BDT.
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